Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://app.uff.br/riuff/handle/1/17802
Title: Modulação da atividade migratória de células germinativas primordiais em embriões de Gallus gallus domesticus L.
Keywords: Células germinativas;  Migração;  Matriz extracelular;  Embrião de galinha;  Movimento celular
Issue Date: 24-Feb-2005
Publisher: Universidade Federal Fluminense
Abstract: In the present study, chick embryos, non treated and treated with busulfan® during the period from 1 to 6 days of incubation (stages 5 to 30) were used. These embryos were transversally sectioned in different levels, according to migratory pathway of primordial germ cells. The sections were then stained: 1. by Haematoxilin and Eosin for morphological observation; 2. by Periodic Acid Schiff, for the study of interactive glycoproteins and identification of primordial germ cells; sulfated and non sulfated glycosaminoglycans were observed by Alcian Blue (pH 2,5 and pH 1,0, respectively)and collagen was observed by Sirius Red Technique. Migration of primordial germ cells has a continuous flux. The route begins in germinal crescent, passes into the blood vessels and then reaches the interstitium destined to the developing gonads, where primordial germ cells colonize. Along the route, it was noted that interactive glycoproteins reduce right after the beginning of the intersticial migration phase. The same happens with sulfated glycosaminoglycans, that it could be related to a mechanism of compensation on the cell migration. On the other hand, in busulfan treated embryos, the amount of sulfated glycosaminoglycans (supposed to be hialuronic acid) increases, and, also, compensates the migration. Atrophic gonads were seen in busulfan treated embryos. The quantity of collagen was not modified along the route. These results suggest that extracellular matrix compounds participate actively by modulating the migration of primordial germ cells.
URI: https://app.uff.br/riuff/handle/1/17802
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